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The Game beschenkte uns am Valentinstag mit seinem besten Dickpic ever—​womit auch sonst? Wir können uns wohl alle glücklich schätzen, wenn wir. The Game, von GettyImages/Mike Windle. Penis-Parade Er kann es einfach nicht lassen. Zum Tag der Liebe am gestrigen Sonntag wollte The. The Game-players of Titan | Dick, Philip K. | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Philip Kindred Dick (* Dezember in Chicago, Illinois; † 2. März in Santa Ana, The Game-Players of Titan. Ace Books, New York City – Neueste Ausgabe von Harper Voyager, , ISBN Deutsche Ausgabe: Das. Finden Sie Top-Angebote für The Game-Players of Titan von Dick, Philip K. | Buch | Zustand sehr gut bei eBay. Kostenlose Lieferung für viele Artikel!

The Game Dick

Finden Sie Top-Angebote für The Game-Players of Titan von Dick, Philip K. | Buch | Zustand sehr gut bei eBay. Kostenlose Lieferung für viele Artikel! The duck with a dick description stated the duck had a detachable dick however when we received it and took it out of the box the dick would not detach. The Game, von GettyImages/Mike Windle. Penis-Parade Er kann es einfach nicht lassen. Zum Tag der Liebe am gestrigen Sonntag wollte The. Jetzt gibts was auf die Ohren - Hörbücher bestellen Sie bei büsynergon.be versandkostenfrei online: The Game-Players of Titan. Die Single 12" Dick Smith Band: Givin' The Game Away EP (Limited-Anniversary-​Edition) jetzt portofrei kaufen. Mehr von Dick Smith Band gibt es im Shop. The duck with a dick description stated the duck had a detachable dick however when we received it and took it out of the box the dick would not detach. Jetzt verfügbar bei synergon.be - Soft cover - Ace Books, New York - - Zustand: Near Fine - 1st Edition - No Jacket - First edition / First printing. Illustrated.

The Game Dick Video

D*ck - Moby Dick-based Card Game (Beer and Board Games) The Game Dick

The Game Dick Video

THE GIN GAME - DICK VAN DYKE \u0026 MARY TYLER MOORE

Browse Browse. Community Hub. In this narrated unfair platformer there's one man who's always out to get you The Narrator. He's a real jerk, but with determination and a lot of skill MAYBE you can make it through this crazy adventure.

Remastered with new Online Co-Op and Extended gameplay! All Reviews:. Adam DeLease. Popular user-defined tags for this product:.

Sign in or Open in Steam. Includes 24 Steam Achievements. Publisher: Adam DeLease. Share Embed.

Add to Cart. Bundle info. Add to Account. Add all DLC to Cart. You wander around confused Wake up! Then it returns "Go right you idiot!

What are you doing just standing there? You're unsure He's a major DICK! The Narrator is back, and he's more of a DICK than ever, but don't worry because now you can take him down with your friends in the all new online co-op mode.

If that's not enough, don't worry because new pals are here to help, as you can play as any character in the game! Improved Gameplay - Overall the game just feels better and smoother to play.

Multiplayer - Play every level together with your friends in rooms of up to players. Time Trial - Speed runners rejoice as your time played is now tracked in-game, making it easy to decide who is truly the best.

Improved Graphics - New and Improved Sprites. Subtitles - Subtitles to Improve Accessibility. Animations - New and Improved Animations.

Details - New and Improved Level Details. System Requirements Windows. Minimum: OS: Ubuntu See all. In this sardonically funny gem of speculative fiction, Philip K.

Dick creates a novel that manages to be simultaneously unpredictable and perversely logical. Poor Pete Garden has just lost Berkeley. He's also lost his wife, but he'll get a new one as soon as he rolls a three.

It's all part of the rules of Bluff, the game that's become a blinding obsession for the last inha In this sardonically funny gem of speculative fiction, Philip K.

It's all part of the rules of Bluff, the game that's become a blinding obsession for the last inhabitants of the planet Earth.

But the rules are about to change--drastically and terminally--because Pete Garden will be playing his next game against an opponent who isn't even human, for stakes that are a lot higher than Berkeley.

Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. More Details Original Title. Pete Garden. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about The Game-Players of Titan , please sign up. This question contains spoilers… view spoiler [I cannot understand two plot points: 1 how can Pat and Allen McClain, two vugs, have human children?

Iris Schechter 1 I would say they have been replaced by vulgs after the birth of the third child. See 1 question about The Game-Players of Titan….

Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of The Game-Players of Titan.

Aug 13, Lyn rated it really liked it. First published in , one noticeable omission from the above list is any deep theological undertones.

This is one of his more fun novels, in the category with Gala Checklist of common PKD novel elements present in Game Players of Titan: drug use — check!

This is one of his more fun novels, in the category with Galactic Pot-Healer and The Crack in Space , though it also closely resembles Dr.

Bloodmoney in its post apocalyptic kookiness. In this novel, Phil describes a far future Earth where we have been defeated by a race of telepathic slugs from Titan.

Amongst the wreckage of our lost civilization is the need to play a board game somewhat resembling Life to trade property and wives.

Wildly fantastic, subtly absurdist and altogether fun for PKD fans, Game Players of Titan is one of his better offerings.

I would not be surprised if this one joins the ranks of PKD stories developed into a film. View all 17 comments. Power to the people!

Unfortunately, in Philip K. Dick's novel The Game-Players of Titan , we're two hundred years into the future, the people are the entire human race and humans have anything but power — in the aftermath of Hinkle radiation and losing a war with the Titanians aka vugs from Planet Titan, the human population has been decimated, only a handful of couples can have kids and those vugs hold the real power.

This is a world of advanced technology with such things as The Rushmore E Power to the people! This is a world of advanced technology with such things as The Rushmore Effect wherein elevators, medicine cabinets and flying automobiles are programed to answer questions by speaking the truth.

And the vugs? There are some vugs here on Earth to keep tabs on human activity, participation in the Game heading up the list. The Game-Players of Titan is one weird, wild, freaky fiction.

PKD works his magic to scramble all sorts of spaced out madness into his speculative stew. Pete Garden: an ordinary kind of guy with suicidal tendencies and gloomy, manic-depressive phases, a guy prone to addiction to liquor and especially drugs.

Oh, yes, Pete can get extremely paranoid, frequently for good reason - he has hallucinations that we humans are all surrounded by vugs. Or, maybe he's actually seeing the truth?

Even paranoids have enemies. I bet when he was a little kid, Pete saw the sippy cup as half empty. And you've has such bad luck playing the game recently, Pete!

You lost Berkeley, California and also your latest wife. You need a three to get yourself a new wife — and you desperately want Berkeley back; you're willing to trade three small cities in Marin County.

What you really need, Pete, is some luck - either in yourself or in a new Game playing partner. Joe Shilling: Poor Joe!

Subsequently, he dropped from Bindman to a non-B the major distinction in status in this brave new depopulated world. But thanks to his good buddy Pete, Joe can rejoin the game.

Once at the table for the ultimate stakes, Joe shares a true gem of wisdom: the biggest enemies for a game player are greed and fear.

Thus spoke Shilling. Lesson to last a lifetime. Since this luscious lady can read minds, she is automatically disqualified from the Game, forever relegated to non-B status, a fact of life that makes her furious.

Sounds like Pat might have something to hid from the Bindmen. Mary Anne McClain: Holy psychokinesis! Oh, funky baby! I want you on my side.

As do Pete and his fellow players. Jerome Luckman: lucky guy at the Game: lucky guy at having children. Is there such a thing as too much luck?

The fate of this New Yorker adds yet again another philosophic dimension to the novel. Carol Holt: Pete's new wife. He did come up with a three, after all.

Shortly following their marriage, turns out Carol is pregnant. Oh, lucky day for both Carol and Pete. Now our protagonist truly has the stakes raised as he gambles at the Game and takes his chances at life.

Dave Mutreaux: A pre-cog, that is, someone able to tell the future, another type of person excluded from the Game. And the players have an EEG Machine to detect if someone wishing to come to the table is a pre-cog.

However, the more PKD develops his story, the more Dave and his pre-cog abilities rise in importance. In the game of life, always a good idea to befriend a person who can warn you of the consequences of possible bad decisions.

Vugs on Titan: There's the ultimate Game. It's Pete and his group versus the vug master game players on Titan.

But alas, even if the vugs lose, those critters still wield tremendous power. The vugs just might take W. Who can Pete trust when appearances frequently differ so radically from reality?

In many ways, the challenges Pete and his fellow players face are similar to our own. Decision making here is more in the spirit of gaming and game theory, of bluffing and calling bluff, of relying on skill and playing the odds, all along counting on a bit of luck.

And please remember, no matter where you are on the game board or where you are in life, greed and fear will rarely work to your advantage.

Such a flaky, fun novel. One of the most enjoyable PKDs I've come across. It was, Joe Schilling thought, like a fundamental breakdown of the act of perception itself Is this the understructure of the universe itself?

The world outside of space and time, beyond the modes of cognition? Dick, The Game-Players of Titan View all 10 comments. Mar 25, Bradley rated it really liked it Shelves: sci-fi.

The first time I read this was years ago and I remember thinking how wild it was to have so many of PKD's normal theme soup all in one place. You know I mean, aside from the fact it's not quite as good as the Player of Games by Iain M.

Banks, the two are quite similar. I can see Banks sitting down to write and think, how could I improve up The first time I read this was years ago and I remember thinking how wild it was to have so many of PKD's normal theme soup all in one place.

I can see Banks sitting down to write and think, how could I improve upon this novel. I have robots, interstellar war, a better game, and intrigue.

But then PKD had all the rest and murder, memory alteration, prolonged life, and genocide. It all boils down to execution. I have to put things in their proper place.

Aliens begging for rare records and entire cities being the stakes in a bet is quite delicious. Don't expect a really deep read, however.

This one is all about the fun and the twists throughout the plot. Dick, The Game-Players of Titan Books seem to float into my life in pairs, like aces, kings, or quite often twos.

Philip K. Dick uses the basics of a game of chance to introduce the idea of a group of people on Earth who gamble not for small stakes, but for cities and counties.

Pots are filled with Berkeley and Detroit instead of watches and coins. Add to this mix, drugs, paranoia, aliens, and the pot both thickens and grows.

I usually walk away from a Dick novel amazed in the same way I'm amazed at Darwin. You see what he did, understand the idea almost instantly, and kick yourself for not being born first and thinking in a way that produces the end result.

Dick seems naturally talented at looking at the world from a slightly warped perspective. He seems to both float in a lactescent zone by himself, but at the same time he is able to hold onto the teats of the world tight enough to squeeze out an amazing story every couple years.

View 1 comment. Dec 14, P. In the aftermath of an inter-species war somewhere around the 22th century, Terrans and Vugs settled on a military 'Concordate', stating the rules which both species have to obey from then on.

Take one of these rules : As Vugs frown on plain causality, now your life as a Terran is determined by how you fare playing a game.

The stakes in this game from Titan are extensive urban areas, called 'binds'. If you are lucky, then you become a powerful Bindman, if not Also, if you happen to be a male player and lose a Bind, you lose your current wife, along with other pieces of furniture.

That's right. You see, wives are bets, too. However, chancy as the Game seems, you soon realize vugs and humans try to prevent the game from relying on pure luck, making use of mind-reading, mind-sculpting, precognition, altering physical reality, etc.

In my opinion, that does not even out the story. On the contrary, it accounts for a very sketchy plot indeed and a lot of loose ends view spoiler [ We scarcely know anything about the countries which were allies to the Red Chinese during the war against the US ; how personal property is managed when you lose a Bind in the Game?

How come Rushmore Effect is infallible? To me, here is where the story failed. Relations amidst player groups are hardly plausible : do you really believe people would be that cheerful and good-humoured if they were liable to regularly lose huge property, status and partners to one another?

As far as I know, the Players' motives to gather and play for such stakes on a regular basis For instance : is it always the woman who is being forfeited?

Is there any room for dissent about the whole game? In the end, the superior longevity of the characters average y.

More, the dialogue is uneasy and sometimes inordinately clunky, featuring rough spins and abrupt lines, esp. Incidentally, the latter are revolving around Pete, merely competing, vying for his attention, one way or another.

Which sadly takes away all possible depth out of characters quite shallow from the start. On the whole, the story felt as if it was being cooked up into existence just as you are reading it Which accounts for some frantic action but just does not make the trick as a consistent story-telling method.

Not the most enjoyable PKD I have read. Music : Any title by Magma. Aug 18, Sandy rated it really liked it.

Dick's 10th novel, "The Game-Players of Titan," was originally released in as an Ace paperback F, for all the collectors out there , with a cover price of a whopping 40 cents.

His follow-up to the Hugo Award-winning "The Man in the High Castle," it was one of six novels that Phil saw published from '64, during one of the most sustained and brilliant creative bursts in sci-fi history.

Like so many of the author's works, the action in "Game-Players" transpires on a futuris Philip K. Like so many of the author's works, the action in "Game-Players" transpires on a futuristic Earth around the year , if I read between the lines correctly that has been laid waste by war and hard radiation.

Here, it has been years since mankind fought the vugs of the Saturnian moon Titan to a stalemate, and now an uneasy peace of sorts reigns, while the fortunate landowners of the depleted, sterile society play a game called Bluff and wager gigantic chunks of real estate at the table.

When we first meet the book's central character, Pete Garden, a suicidal, year-old landowner, he is sorely upset due to his recent loss of Berkeley at that night's game And Pete's lot is soon to get a lot worse, when the newest member of his playing group is abruptly murdered, Pete's memory is blanked out, and suspicion falls squarely upon him.

And that murder rap just opens up an ever-widening labyrinth of political intrigue and escalating paranoia for the poor, befuddled character.

I must say, this is one of the wildest, most imaginative, most way-out Dickian jaunts that I have ever encountered The book is filled with all kinds of interesting touches, from talking cars, tea kettles and bathroom cabinets to the fascinating sequence in which a telepath examines the mind of a "pre-cog.

For example, the car that Joe Schilling, Pete's best friend a bearded manager of a classical music store, as Phil had been in the early '50s, and a clear stand-in here for the author , drives, is a riot, responding to its owner's commands with comments such as "Up yours.

Those vugs, by the way, are silicon based, Phil here beating "Star Trek"'s Horta to the silicic punch by a good four years!

Typical for a Dick novel, the book is compulsively readable and brimming with ideas. And as for Dick's favorite theme, that of the elusiveness of objective reality, boy, does this novel deliver in spades, and then some!

And that is part of the problem. In this book--where the vugs are capable of mind control, and many characters lie to one another, and red herrings abound, and in which Pete Garden takes so many pills with his booze that he has psychotic episodes--it really is impossible to tell what's what.

To make matters even more confusing, the vugs are capable of appearing human and some can even teleport Earth folk instantaneously to Titan or to some in-between limbo state.

In short, readers will be hard put to ever know what is real, who is what, where we are or whom we can trust.

It is Dick at his most paranoid and extreme, and although it does make for fun reading, I'm not sure that the whole thing hangs together logically, or whether the motivations of several characters are consistent.

Heck, this is a murder mystery in which the identity of the killer is never even revealed! I was ultimately left unsure, by the book's conclusion, if several characters were actual vugs or merely humans being controlled by vugs.

Those vugs, by the way, are never adequately described by Phil; he just tells us that they are "amorphous" and have pseudopods.

Six feet tall or six inches? Who knows? And although Dick's novel ends happily, for the most part, the author seems unable to resist throwing in some downbeat ambiguity in the final pages.

This is clearly a book that could have seen a sequel, a common temptation for sci-fi writers and one that Phil, amazingly, never succumbed to.

In all, a highly readable and entertaining novel from Dick's middle period, if a bewildering one. View all 5 comments. New introduction by Robert Thurston.

Note: This is not a library copy. Roaming the pristine landscape of Earth, cared for by machines and aliens, the few remaining humans alive since the war with Titan play Bluff, allowing them to win or lose property and also form new marriages in order to maximize the remote chance some pairings will produce a child.

When Pete Garden, a particularly suicidal member of the Pretty Blue Fox game-playing group, loses his current wife and his deed to Berkeley, he st New introduction by Robert Thurston.

When Pete Garden, a particularly suicidal member of the Pretty Blue Fox game-playing group, loses his current wife and his deed to Berkeley, he stumbles upon a far bigger, more sinister version of the game.

The telepathic, slug-like Vugs of Titan are the players and at stake is the Earth itself. The Game-Players of Titan is a brilliantly conceived vision of a future dystopia, full of imaginative detail, moments of pure humor and thought-provoking musings on the nature of perception, as the seemingly straightforward narrative soon turns into a tumultuous nightmare of delusion, precognition and conspiracy.

Sep 02, Charles Dee Mitchell rated it really liked it Shelves: mid-century-sf. I don't know that he was ever psychotic, that term was tossed around differently in the 's than it would be today.

But drunk and on amphetamines,? During the time he was writ "Anyhow, Pete Garden, you were psychotic and drunk and on amphetamines and hallucinating, but basically you perceived the reality that confronts us During the time he was writing this novel PKD walked daily from his home to his "writing shack" about a mile down the road.

In the blue, Northern California sky, he saw a gigantic malevolent face. It had empty slots for eyes -- it was metal and cruel and, worst of all, it was God.

Whatever the case, it didn't go away for days. So, I think that is another "yes" for hallucinating. In Game Players of Titan , earth has been dealt a double blow.

As per usual with Dick, there has been an atomic war, this one started by the Red Chinese using a new weapon developed in East Germany.

Nice period details, there. The radiation released by the new weapon sterilizes the populations it is directed against, but wind currents being what they are, the Red Chinese have inadvertently almost completely sterilized the human race.

To add insult to injury, beings from Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, have invaded and conquered earth.

They are the Vugs, oversized amoebas that sound a bit like Al Capp's Shmoo. Humans find them irritating and keep Vug sticks on hand for pushing them out of rooms.

But the Vugs are, in their way, benevolent landlords. Longevity drugs allow humans to live into their hundreds while never looking much over 30 or 40 years of age.

With earth's population in the low millions, lucky humans are Bindmen, property owners whose properties include towns, cities, and vast swathes of the depopulated planet.

If you are a Bindman you must also play the Titans' game. The Titans' game seems like nothing more than a rudimentary board game, a simplified form of Monopoly but with all your landholdings at stake.

Peter Garden's loss of Berkeley in the first chapter of the book sets in motion events that will involve murder, interplanetary travel, telekinesis, ESP, and large quantities of alcohol and amphetamines.

Along with Berkeley, Garden loses his current wife, but acquires a new one that same night. Another purpose of the game is to keep reshuffling human couples in hopes of finding those who can still "get lucky," the current term for becoming pregnant.

Garden's spectacular bender that takes up much of the book occurs when he discovers that with his new wife he has gotten lucky for the first time and on their first night.

He ingests every pill in the house and starts hitting the bars. What he discovers are conspiracies within conspiracies, Vug infiltration of his closest friends, and an offer to play the ultimate game to decide the fate of the earth.

It is a masterpiece of paranoia, where no one can be trusted to be who they claim to be, where rules are made to be broken, and the protagonist must bluff his way through a game that he knows is a deadly sham.

And how do you go about bluffing if half the people in the room can read your mind? The fact that PKD works out a method implies that he had spent for too much energy in his personal life dealing with just barely more earthbound versions of these same issues.

And remember that every morning, on his walk to his typewriter, he must endure the glaring, empty eyes of a malevolent god.

View 2 comments.

The vugs just might take W. Who can Pete trust when appearances frequently differ so radically from reality? In many ways, the challenges Pete and his fellow players face are similar to our own.

Decision making here is more in the spirit of gaming and game theory, of bluffing and calling bluff, of relying on skill and playing the odds, all along counting on a bit of luck.

And please remember, no matter where you are on the game board or where you are in life, greed and fear will rarely work to your advantage.

Such a flaky, fun novel. One of the most enjoyable PKDs I've come across. It was, Joe Schilling thought, like a fundamental breakdown of the act of perception itself Is this the understructure of the universe itself?

The world outside of space and time, beyond the modes of cognition? Dick, The Game-Players of Titan View all 10 comments.

Mar 25, Bradley rated it really liked it Shelves: sci-fi. The first time I read this was years ago and I remember thinking how wild it was to have so many of PKD's normal theme soup all in one place.

You know I mean, aside from the fact it's not quite as good as the Player of Games by Iain M. Banks, the two are quite similar. I can see Banks sitting down to write and think, how could I improve up The first time I read this was years ago and I remember thinking how wild it was to have so many of PKD's normal theme soup all in one place.

I can see Banks sitting down to write and think, how could I improve upon this novel. I have robots, interstellar war, a better game, and intrigue.

But then PKD had all the rest and murder, memory alteration, prolonged life, and genocide. It all boils down to execution.

I have to put things in their proper place. Aliens begging for rare records and entire cities being the stakes in a bet is quite delicious.

Don't expect a really deep read, however. This one is all about the fun and the twists throughout the plot. Dick, The Game-Players of Titan Books seem to float into my life in pairs, like aces, kings, or quite often twos.

Philip K. Dick uses the basics of a game of chance to introduce the idea of a group of people on Earth who gamble not for small stakes, but for cities and counties.

Pots are filled with Berkeley and Detroit instead of watches and coins. Add to this mix, drugs, paranoia, aliens, and the pot both thickens and grows.

I usually walk away from a Dick novel amazed in the same way I'm amazed at Darwin. You see what he did, understand the idea almost instantly, and kick yourself for not being born first and thinking in a way that produces the end result.

Dick seems naturally talented at looking at the world from a slightly warped perspective. He seems to both float in a lactescent zone by himself, but at the same time he is able to hold onto the teats of the world tight enough to squeeze out an amazing story every couple years.

View 1 comment. Dec 14, P. In the aftermath of an inter-species war somewhere around the 22th century, Terrans and Vugs settled on a military 'Concordate', stating the rules which both species have to obey from then on.

Take one of these rules : As Vugs frown on plain causality, now your life as a Terran is determined by how you fare playing a game. The stakes in this game from Titan are extensive urban areas, called 'binds'.

If you are lucky, then you become a powerful Bindman, if not Also, if you happen to be a male player and lose a Bind, you lose your current wife, along with other pieces of furniture.

That's right. You see, wives are bets, too. However, chancy as the Game seems, you soon realize vugs and humans try to prevent the game from relying on pure luck, making use of mind-reading, mind-sculpting, precognition, altering physical reality, etc.

In my opinion, that does not even out the story. On the contrary, it accounts for a very sketchy plot indeed and a lot of loose ends view spoiler [ We scarcely know anything about the countries which were allies to the Red Chinese during the war against the US ; how personal property is managed when you lose a Bind in the Game?

How come Rushmore Effect is infallible? To me, here is where the story failed. Relations amidst player groups are hardly plausible : do you really believe people would be that cheerful and good-humoured if they were liable to regularly lose huge property, status and partners to one another?

As far as I know, the Players' motives to gather and play for such stakes on a regular basis For instance : is it always the woman who is being forfeited?

Is there any room for dissent about the whole game? In the end, the superior longevity of the characters average y.

More, the dialogue is uneasy and sometimes inordinately clunky, featuring rough spins and abrupt lines, esp. Incidentally, the latter are revolving around Pete, merely competing, vying for his attention, one way or another.

Which sadly takes away all possible depth out of characters quite shallow from the start. On the whole, the story felt as if it was being cooked up into existence just as you are reading it Which accounts for some frantic action but just does not make the trick as a consistent story-telling method.

Not the most enjoyable PKD I have read. Music : Any title by Magma. Aug 18, Sandy rated it really liked it. Dick's 10th novel, "The Game-Players of Titan," was originally released in as an Ace paperback F, for all the collectors out there , with a cover price of a whopping 40 cents.

His follow-up to the Hugo Award-winning "The Man in the High Castle," it was one of six novels that Phil saw published from '64, during one of the most sustained and brilliant creative bursts in sci-fi history.

Like so many of the author's works, the action in "Game-Players" transpires on a futuris Philip K. Like so many of the author's works, the action in "Game-Players" transpires on a futuristic Earth around the year , if I read between the lines correctly that has been laid waste by war and hard radiation.

Here, it has been years since mankind fought the vugs of the Saturnian moon Titan to a stalemate, and now an uneasy peace of sorts reigns, while the fortunate landowners of the depleted, sterile society play a game called Bluff and wager gigantic chunks of real estate at the table.

When we first meet the book's central character, Pete Garden, a suicidal, year-old landowner, he is sorely upset due to his recent loss of Berkeley at that night's game And Pete's lot is soon to get a lot worse, when the newest member of his playing group is abruptly murdered, Pete's memory is blanked out, and suspicion falls squarely upon him.

And that murder rap just opens up an ever-widening labyrinth of political intrigue and escalating paranoia for the poor, befuddled character.

I must say, this is one of the wildest, most imaginative, most way-out Dickian jaunts that I have ever encountered The book is filled with all kinds of interesting touches, from talking cars, tea kettles and bathroom cabinets to the fascinating sequence in which a telepath examines the mind of a "pre-cog.

For example, the car that Joe Schilling, Pete's best friend a bearded manager of a classical music store, as Phil had been in the early '50s, and a clear stand-in here for the author , drives, is a riot, responding to its owner's commands with comments such as "Up yours.

Those vugs, by the way, are silicon based, Phil here beating "Star Trek"'s Horta to the silicic punch by a good four years!

Typical for a Dick novel, the book is compulsively readable and brimming with ideas. And as for Dick's favorite theme, that of the elusiveness of objective reality, boy, does this novel deliver in spades, and then some!

And that is part of the problem. In this book--where the vugs are capable of mind control, and many characters lie to one another, and red herrings abound, and in which Pete Garden takes so many pills with his booze that he has psychotic episodes--it really is impossible to tell what's what.

To make matters even more confusing, the vugs are capable of appearing human and some can even teleport Earth folk instantaneously to Titan or to some in-between limbo state.

In short, readers will be hard put to ever know what is real, who is what, where we are or whom we can trust. It is Dick at his most paranoid and extreme, and although it does make for fun reading, I'm not sure that the whole thing hangs together logically, or whether the motivations of several characters are consistent.

Heck, this is a murder mystery in which the identity of the killer is never even revealed! I was ultimately left unsure, by the book's conclusion, if several characters were actual vugs or merely humans being controlled by vugs.

Those vugs, by the way, are never adequately described by Phil; he just tells us that they are "amorphous" and have pseudopods.

Six feet tall or six inches? Who knows? And although Dick's novel ends happily, for the most part, the author seems unable to resist throwing in some downbeat ambiguity in the final pages.

This is clearly a book that could have seen a sequel, a common temptation for sci-fi writers and one that Phil, amazingly, never succumbed to. In all, a highly readable and entertaining novel from Dick's middle period, if a bewildering one.

View all 5 comments. New introduction by Robert Thurston. Note: This is not a library copy. Roaming the pristine landscape of Earth, cared for by machines and aliens, the few remaining humans alive since the war with Titan play Bluff, allowing them to win or lose property and also form new marriages in order to maximize the remote chance some pairings will produce a child.

When Pete Garden, a particularly suicidal member of the Pretty Blue Fox game-playing group, loses his current wife and his deed to Berkeley, he st New introduction by Robert Thurston.

When Pete Garden, a particularly suicidal member of the Pretty Blue Fox game-playing group, loses his current wife and his deed to Berkeley, he stumbles upon a far bigger, more sinister version of the game.

The telepathic, slug-like Vugs of Titan are the players and at stake is the Earth itself. The Game-Players of Titan is a brilliantly conceived vision of a future dystopia, full of imaginative detail, moments of pure humor and thought-provoking musings on the nature of perception, as the seemingly straightforward narrative soon turns into a tumultuous nightmare of delusion, precognition and conspiracy.

Sep 02, Charles Dee Mitchell rated it really liked it Shelves: mid-century-sf. I don't know that he was ever psychotic, that term was tossed around differently in the 's than it would be today.

But drunk and on amphetamines,? During the time he was writ "Anyhow, Pete Garden, you were psychotic and drunk and on amphetamines and hallucinating, but basically you perceived the reality that confronts us During the time he was writing this novel PKD walked daily from his home to his "writing shack" about a mile down the road.

In the blue, Northern California sky, he saw a gigantic malevolent face. It had empty slots for eyes -- it was metal and cruel and, worst of all, it was God.

Whatever the case, it didn't go away for days. So, I think that is another "yes" for hallucinating.

In Game Players of Titan , earth has been dealt a double blow. As per usual with Dick, there has been an atomic war, this one started by the Red Chinese using a new weapon developed in East Germany.

Nice period details, there. The radiation released by the new weapon sterilizes the populations it is directed against, but wind currents being what they are, the Red Chinese have inadvertently almost completely sterilized the human race.

To add insult to injury, beings from Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, have invaded and conquered earth. They are the Vugs, oversized amoebas that sound a bit like Al Capp's Shmoo.

Humans find them irritating and keep Vug sticks on hand for pushing them out of rooms. But the Vugs are, in their way, benevolent landlords.

Longevity drugs allow humans to live into their hundreds while never looking much over 30 or 40 years of age. With earth's population in the low millions, lucky humans are Bindmen, property owners whose properties include towns, cities, and vast swathes of the depopulated planet.

If you are a Bindman you must also play the Titans' game. The Titans' game seems like nothing more than a rudimentary board game, a simplified form of Monopoly but with all your landholdings at stake.

Peter Garden's loss of Berkeley in the first chapter of the book sets in motion events that will involve murder, interplanetary travel, telekinesis, ESP, and large quantities of alcohol and amphetamines.

Along with Berkeley, Garden loses his current wife, but acquires a new one that same night. Another purpose of the game is to keep reshuffling human couples in hopes of finding those who can still "get lucky," the current term for becoming pregnant.

Garden's spectacular bender that takes up much of the book occurs when he discovers that with his new wife he has gotten lucky for the first time and on their first night.

He ingests every pill in the house and starts hitting the bars. What he discovers are conspiracies within conspiracies, Vug infiltration of his closest friends, and an offer to play the ultimate game to decide the fate of the earth.

It is a masterpiece of paranoia, where no one can be trusted to be who they claim to be, where rules are made to be broken, and the protagonist must bluff his way through a game that he knows is a deadly sham.

And how do you go about bluffing if half the people in the room can read your mind? The fact that PKD works out a method implies that he had spent for too much energy in his personal life dealing with just barely more earthbound versions of these same issues.

And remember that every morning, on his walk to his typewriter, he must endure the glaring, empty eyes of a malevolent god.

View 2 comments. Shelves: read-during-global-pandemic , thes , failed-visionary-cults , sci-fi , california. A mysterious crooner by the name of Nats Katz.

Characters who are all casually familiar with the theories of Jung. Yes, you've stepped into another Philip K.

Dick novel. Also, get ready to hear a lot about Vugs. What's that, you don't know what a Vug is? Well, I can see how that might bug you. The Game-Players of Titan written '63, published '63 is another novel in Ph "It had been a bad night, and when he tried to drive home he had a terrible argument with his car.

The Game-Players of Titan written '63, published '63 is another novel in Phil's prolific early 60s run. As in Clans of the Alphane Moon written ''64, published '64 , the story takes place in the aftermath of a war between Earth and an alien race, and the aliens in question- Vugs from Titan in this case, Saturn's largest moon- are known as great gamblers and lovers of chance, maybe not unlike a certain science-fiction writer who once or twice plotted a novel with the help of the I-Ching.

In contrast to Clans , however, this is a war that Earth has lost; the planet is now depopulated not primarily due to the war however, but to the sterilizing effects of the Hinkel radiation designed by Nazi scientist Bernhardt Hinkel and used as a weapon during a separate, Sino-American war and under the more-or-less benevolent administration of Titan, sort of like the relationship between Guam and the United States.

Naturally there are some extremist hard-line Vugs who make the relationship volatile, though in general things don't sound that bad: the Vugs, in accordance with their great love of gambling and chance, simply require Earth's remaining inhabitants to play a Monopoly-like board game called Bluff for the ownership of various locales an almost entirely depopulated Berkley, CA for example , as well as to determine their spouses well, why not, you've got to be adaptable in life A fun novel.

Not bad, but it's probably not going to stick in my memory either. Not exactly what I expected with a title like that or a blurb like the one found on this printing but what I didn't expect and don't ask me why I ignored it was an allegory of Cold War America told through an interstellar cold war with aliens from Titan.

So Dick wanted to be thought of as a literary writer not a pulpy sci-fi author, and I say fair enough as my experiences of his work so far point to the obvious conclusion that this drug fuelled writer had a lot more to say than most sci-fi Not exactly what I expected with a title like that or a blurb like the one found on this printing but what I didn't expect and don't ask me why I ignored it was an allegory of Cold War America told through an interstellar cold war with aliens from Titan.

So Dick wanted to be thought of as a literary writer not a pulpy sci-fi author, and I say fair enough as my experiences of his work so far point to the obvious conclusion that this drug fuelled writer had a lot more to say than most sci-fi writers of teh time and seemingly better tools to say it with.

It's a shame that just because you write in genre fiction you are immediately dismissed as being less than Jhumpa Lahiri but sadly great ideas men and women will forever be faced with this off hand dismissal like so much Dan Brown on the bottom of your shoe.

That being said a sci-fi novel dealing with McCarthyism et al struggles to make much of an impression on this reader nearly 50 years after its initial publication.

Dec 09, Jason Young rated it really liked it Shelves: , fiction. It's trippy and weird, and has a slightly upsetting and unsatisfactory ending, yet is still so good.

Jan 21, Judy rated it really liked it Shelves: 20th-century-fiction , books-from , sci-fi , speculative-fiction. Reading Philip K Dick, for me, is like hanging out with a super odd friend and just marveling at how very odd he is.

This is the ninth book I have read by him. I am reading his books roughly in the order he published them though I have skipped a few.

He was very prolific at the beginning and it seems I can only take so much of his clunky prose. However, he was so prescient, perhaps the most of all speculative writers ever and that is why he fascinates me and many other readers.

In this one, Ear Reading Philip K Dick, for me, is like hanging out with a super odd friend and just marveling at how very odd he is.

In this one, Earth is ruled by an alien race that presents as amorphous blobs. The human race is dying off due to a low birth rate.

The remaining adults are obsessed with Bluff, a game in which they gamble for cities and spouses, while drinking heavily. It is funny in a black humor way.

All the characters are unlikable. Everything changes every few pages. The set piece is a game of Bluff on the alien planet Titan, with the two races competing for Earth.

Read it at your own risk! Feb 19, Hertzan Chimera rated it it was amazing. A great war with the Vugs, an alien race from the planet Titan, has seriously decimated the human race.

Mankind finds a way to win a decisive victory against the Vugs, but at the cost of infertility throughout the majority of those few humans who survive the conflict.

There really are no more than a few thousand Americans left on the planet. They spend most of their time playing Bluff, those that have no psi-ability - psis are banned from playing Bluff for obvious reasons.

The political backdrop is the truly alien part of the book. They are the true rulers of the planet. They control the space around planet Earth.

They control what makes the remaining populace tick. Bluff is the drug they use to control mankind. Philip K Dick was a true innovator and seer of the future.

But why ban the psychics from the game? Very simple rule set. Bluff by name. Bluff by nature. In common-or-garden Monopoly you roll your dice, you move your piece.

In true Philip K Dick fashion, the world is treated like a parallel world. Written in , the book harkens back to a time not unlike the end of the Second World War.

It felt like the s. Of course all domestic appliances have Rushmore effects that allow you to communicate with them, of course the cars fly; of course they have heat-needles lasers.

It felt like a place of hope. But Dick only shows us that late in the novel, though hints at the true intentions of the Vugs are there for the astute PKD fan to at least guess at early on.

I've only read one other novel by Philip K. Dick, The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch , but based on these two novels, I'm not really that interested in his writing.

The Game-Players of Titan is strong on plot but weak on characterization. The book has too many characters, all of whom are pretty one-dimensional, and it switches perspectives from character to character too often.

The book does present several intriguing ideas, like the post-apocalyptic world with a tiny population, the game of " I've only read one other novel by Philip K.

The book does present several intriguing ideas, like the post-apocalyptic world with a tiny population, the game of "Bluff" itself, and the interactions between the telepaths and the game-players, as well as the interactions between the vugs and the humans.

But there are too many ideas in the book, and none of it really comes together. The main problem is that I just didn't care about any of the characters, including the bipolar protagonist.

This is great fun pulp written only the way PKD could. It's a hilarious romp in his weird future world views. The over-all idea was more what I had expected "Solar Lottery" to be, but it was so much more.

The world is ruled by some sort of alien slug creatures from Titan. Earth's population is practically sterile, therefore, a big deal is made over the media when a couple manages to get pregnant scores.

A man may go through many wives during a lifetime, hoping that they might make that rare comb This is great fun pulp written only the way PKD could.

A man may go through many wives during a lifetime, hoping that they might make that rare combination - the constant use of "rabbit paper" is a very funny thing.

The gaming element in the story is especially outrageous. A game called Bluff, which is similar to Monopoly or Life is played wagering actual real estate and such is pulled off as a normal thing in a way that only PKD could.

Overall, this book is one of his most outrageous and entertaining efforts. Nov 06, Chris rated it liked it. It's interesting how comprehensive a novel Gameplayers is - it comprises so many of the bizarre, unique elements characteristic of the PKD classics.

Gameplayers is not a particularly amazing novel or a favorite, but it is bizarre and exceptionally memorable - and certainly a quick, worthwhile read.

Physic characters, bizarre ideas and a ending that wanders. Yet again another PKD novel that didn't really work out for me.

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In this game the narrator is always trying to mess you up, or is he? He lies and cheats and tells jokes and its up to you as the Player to survive in this already dangerous land all the while a voice from above tries to ruin it all System Requirements Windows.

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More intriguing still is her teenage daughter, Bet365 Anmelden Anne. No minimum to No maximum. When enabled, off-topic review activity will be filtered out. Here, it has been years since mankind fought the vugs of the Saturnian moon Titan to a stalemate, and now an uneasy peace of sorts reigns, while the fortunate landowners of the depleted, sterile society play a game called Bluff and wager gigantic chunks of real estate at the table. Dick novel. The Narrator.

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Redaktions-Tipp der Woche. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Seine Mainstream-Romane der er Pokerstars Eu frühen er Jahre konnte er nicht veröffentlichen; Csi Games wurde auf sein Genre festgelegt, als die Scott Meredith Literary Agency all seine Entwürfe zurückgab. Internationale Versandkosten gezahlt an Pitney Bowes Inc. Bei gebundenen Büchern ist der Schutzumschlag vorhanden sofern zutreffend. Senden Sie die Ware bitte möglichst nicht unfrei an uns zurück. Nintendo Shop. Versenden Sie auch an Packstationen? KG Bürgermeister-Wegele-Str. Der Betrag kann sich bis zum Zahlungstermin ändern. Unsere Empfehlungen. Zustand des Schutzumschlags: No Jacket. Mois Wiki Homepage des Verkäufers. Shop Gentelmans Club. Alle übrigen Artikel unterliegen der Differenzbesteuerung gem. März wurden die lebenserhaltenden medizinischen Geräte abgeschaltet und Philip K. Bereits als Teenager schrieb Dick seine ersten Gedichte und Kurzgeschichten. Sollte dies The Game Dick Fall sein, setzen Sie sich bitte vor Bewertung mit uns in Verbindung, damit wir ggf. Wir bitten Sie in diesem Fall höflichst, die Ware Bravolotto uns zurückzusenden. Zum Buch. Bitte wählen Sie Ihr Anliegen aus. Anbieterinformationen Business is conducted via internet, mail Exodus Wallet and book fairs. Auf Twitter teilen wird in neuem Fenster oder Tab geöffnet. Crow — James P. Dick hat auch einige Romane ohne Bezug zur Science-Fiction geschrieben. Change after payment is not possible. Dick beruhen auf Dicks Arbeiten und Ideen. Sie haben die Waren unverzüglich und in jedem Fall spätestens binnen vierzehn Tagen ab dem Tag, an dem Sie uns über den Widerruf dieses Vertrags unterrichten, an Doppelte Chance oder an medimops retoure, Am alten FlughafenLeipzig zurückzusenden Cs Go Final zu übergeben. The Game Dick Includes 24 Steam Achievements. In this novel, Phil describes a Karak Spiel future Earth where we have been defeated by Deutschland Internet Ranking race of telepathic slugs from Titan. I highly recommend it. In the game of life, always a good idea to befriend a person who can warn you of the consequences of possible bad decisions. Excluding Off-topic Review Activity. PKD works his magic to scramble all sorts of spaced out madness into his speculative stew. The book does present several intriguing ideas, Paypal Zahlungsmethode UngГјltig the post-apocalyptic world with a tiny population, the game of "Bluff" itself, and the interactions between the telepaths and the game-players, as well as the interactions between the vugs and the humans. I felt myself Happy Farm Spiel to give up on it for the first fifty pages or so.